Cell Phone Skepticism #2: They Are Invasive

Sample Ad Only

We’ve all been in this situation: You are sitting down to enjoy your evening’s TV viewing, or reading a book, or putting the kids to bed, or putting the finishing touches to some important work – and then a phone blares.

It might be yours, it might not. It might be a call, it might be a text message. Whatever the case, it can puncture the sense of anticipation or relaxation.

Many people who do not own a mobile phone give this as one of their most persuasive reasons to remain cell phone free.

They will say it in as many words – “I don’t want people to be able to contact me 24/7.” – and there is plenty of justification for their discomfort with the idea.

After all, when you’re open to contact all the time, you can never be certain of peace and quiet.

This of course should be balanced against the fact that you can always switch your mobile phone off or set it to “silent”.

Indeed, this is considered to be a necessity when you are in a library, most business meetings, a classroom or even on most planes.

But many of us picture the wounded expression of a friend or family member, saying “I tried to contact you but I just got your answer phone”, and find it hard to respond.

No-one expects you to leap into action at their beck and call, though, not if they are in any way reasonable.

If it’s important enough, they will leave a message or find some other way to contact you.

You can always switch your phone off – the precedents mentioned above are enough – and if you know you are likely to be contacted, you can set it to silent and check it every so often.

Sample Ad Only

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *